J. C. Ryle – The Grand Secret of Daily Comfort in Christianity (Christian devotional)

A large video collection of classic hymns, contemporary Praise and Worship songs, and the works (audio books, devotional readings, and sermons) of men greatly used of God, such as: Charles Spurgeon, Jonathan Edwards, A.W. Tozer, A.W. Pink, John Owen, Oswald Chambers, Andrew Murray, E.M. Bounds, John Bunyan, George Whitefield, and many more, covering topics on many aspects of the Christian life. May your time spent here be blessed.

http://vid.io/x3F

J. C. Ryle – The Grand Secret of Daily Comfort in Christianity (Christian devotional)

Hebrews 7:25 Therefore he is able to save completely[a] those who come to God through him, because he always lives to intercede for them.

J. C. Ryle playlist: http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=F5502DD37912A9C7

J. C. Ryle – (1816-1900), first Anglican bishop of Liverpool

John Charles Ryle was born at Macclesfield and was educated at Eton and at Christ Church, Oxford. He was a fine athlete who rowed and played Cricket for Oxford, where he took a first class degree in Greats and was offered a college fellowship (teaching position) which he declined. The son of a wealthy banker, he was destined for a career in politics before answering a call to ordained ministry.

He was spiritually awakened in 1838 while hearing Ephesians 2 read in church. He was ordained by Bishop Sumner at Winchester in 1842. After holding a curacy at Exbury in Hampshire, he became rector of St Thomas’s, Winchester (1843), rector of Helmingham, Suffolk (1844), vicar of Stradbroke (1861), honorary canon of Norwich (1872), and dean of Salisbury (1880). In 1880, at age 64, he became the first bishop of Liverpool, at the recommendation of Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli. He retired in 1900 at age 83 and died later the same year.

Ryle was a strong supporter of the evangelical school and a critic of Ritualism. Among his longer works are Christian Leaders of the Eighteenth Century (1869), Expository Thoughts on the Gospels (7 vols, 1856-69) and Principles for Churchmen (1884).

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The Cup of Wrath – Andrew Bonar / Christian Sermon

A large video collection of classic hymns, contemporary Praise and Worship songs, and the works (audio books, devotional readings, and sermons) of men greatly used of God, such as: Charles Spurgeon, Jonathan Edwards, A.W. Tozer, A.W. Pink, John Owen, Oswald Chambers, Andrew Murray, E.M. Bounds, John Bunyan, George Whitefield, and many more, covering topics on many aspects of the Christian life. May your time spent here be blessed.

http://vid.io/x3F

The Cup of Wrath – Andrew Bonar / Christian Sermon

For in the hand of the LORD there is a cup, and the wine is red; it is full of mixture; and he poureth out of the same: but the dregs thereof, all the wicked of the earth shall wring them out, and drink them. Psalm 75:8 (King James Version)

Andrew Bonar playlist: http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=462D3C425C3832FC

1810
On May 29Andrew Alexander Bonar is born in Edinburgh, Scotland.
He is the seventh son of James and Marjory Bonar. When he is 11 years old, his father dies, but his elder brother James helps his mother to look after the family.
1815(Battle of Waterloo)

1828
He starts writing his diary on 21st August: “About this time I thought of marking occasionally my thoughts and God’s dealings.” For the next two years his main complaint is that he is not saved. “I am still without Christ and without hope. I have no hatred of sin; I seek Christ with little ardour, rather because not happy in the world than because of anything else.”

1831
His first Communion is on 9th January. He writes: “I sought beforehand that at this season I might get more love to the souls of men, more understanding of the Word of God, and more power to keep my thoughts from wandering. I felt little excitement, but much calmness at the Table. I believe I have got increase of power to look at God”.
In the same year he also enters the Divinity Hall. He had kept back from this until he was in Christ, and that meant he waited two years.
Addition of Document signed by Andrew Bonar On Saturday 19th November he and several others start the ‘Exegetical Society’ at 6.30 A.M. “It is to meet for the purpose of Biblical Criticism, begun and concluded with prayer ; in some sort a prayer-meeting over our studies in the Bible. The members of this society included among others Robert Murray M’Cheyne. A document signed by them can be seen on a separate page.
1832 (First Reform Act in Parliament)
1833 (Britain abolishes slavery)
1835
Having finished his studies, he starts pastoral work on trial in Jedburgh in July. His first sermon, prepared with much anxiety and care, is on Isaiah 55:1-3 on 5th of July.
The Thursday of the following week is Fast-Day of the Church of Scotland, and he preaches to the prisoners in Jail in the morning and at Fendyhall in the evening. He writes: “Between sermons meditated on the evils of sin”.
1836
He is engaged as a missionary assistant to Dr. Robert Smith Candlish in St.George’s, Edinburgh. There is an interesting letter from him to Mr. Maclagan in 1874, about some of his experiences here.
1838
New On 20th September he is ordained at Collace in Perthshire. As soon as he awakes in the morning, he reads the confession of sins for ministers and preachers, drawn up by the Assembly in 1661 and applies it to himself. He writes: “O that Isaiah 11:1-9 may be fulfilled to me, that I may be like Christ, daily His witness, His Spirit of wisdom and understanding teaching me the Scriptures”.
He mentions that among those present are Robert M’Cheyne, his closest friend. An old friend and minister says to him: “Remember, it is a remark of old and experienced men, that very few men, and very few ministers, keep up to the end the edge that was on their spirit at the first.”

1841
There have been instances of revival, and he writes: “I felt uncommonly overawed in preaching to-day, just in reading the words of my text, Isaiah 6: ‘Holy, holy, holy,’ and for a few minutes the same feeling seemed to prevail throughout the church. I think it was the Spirit resting on me”. At the end of June, another entry in his diary reads: “Several people much impressed, several in tears”.
1842.
The book Narrative of a mission of inquiry to the Jews From the Church of Scotland in 1839 is published, which he has written together with Robert Murray M’Cheyne.
1843
On Saturday 25th Marchhe writes: “This afternoon about five o’clock, a message has just come to tell me of Robert M’Cheyne’s death. Never, never yet in all my life have I felt anything like this. It is a blow to myself, to his people, to the Church of Christ in Scotland. O Lord, work, for Thine own glory’s sake. Arise, O Lord, the godly ceaseth and the faithful fail. My heart is sore. It makes me feel death near myself now….There was no friend whom I loved like him.”

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Robert Murray McCheyne – He is The Way (Christian devotional)

Robert Murray McCheyne – He is The Way (Christian devotional)

John 14:6 Jesus said to him, “I am the way, the truth, and the life. No one comes to the Father except through Me.

Robert Murray M’Cheyne (pronounced “Mak-shayn”, occasionally spelled as “McCheyne”; 21 May 1813 – 25 March 1843) was a minister in the Church of Scotland from 1835 to 1843.

He was born at Edinburgh, was educated at the University of Edinburgh and at the Divinity Hall of his native city, where he was taught by Thomas Chalmers. He first served as an assistant to John Bonar in the parish of Larbert and Dunipace, near Falkirk, from 1835 to 1838. After this he served as minister of St. Peter’s Church (in Dundee) until his early death at the age of 29 during an epidemic of typhus.

Not long after his death, his friend Andrew Alexander Bonar edited his biography which was published with some of his manuscripts as The Memoir and Remains of the Rev. Robert Murray M’Cheyne. The book went into many editions. It has had a lasting influence on Evangelical Christianity worldwide.

In 1839, M’Cheyne and Bonar, together with two older ministers, Dr. Alexander Black and Dr. Alexander Keith, were sent to Palestine on a mission of inquiry to the condition of the Jews. Upon their return, their official report for the Board of Mission of the Church of Scotland was published as Narrative of a Visit to the Holy Land and Mission of Inquiry to the Jews. This led subsequently to the establishment of missions to the Jews by the Church of Scotland and by the Free Church of Scotland. During M’Cheyne’s absence, his place was filled by the appointment of William Chalmers Burns to preach at St. Peter’s as his assistant.

M’Cheyne was a preacher, a pastor, a poet, and wrote many letters. He was also a man of deep piety and a man of prayer. He never married, but he did have a fiancée at the time of his death, Jessie Thain, who died heartbroken.

M’Cheyne died exactly two months before the Disruption of 1843. This being so, his name was subsequently held in high honour by all the various branches of Scottish Presbyterianism, though he himself held a strong opinion against the Erastianism which led to the Disruption. Bonar records, “And when, on 7 March of the following year (i.e. 1843), the cause of the Church was finally to be pleaded at the bar of the House of Commons, I find him writing: ‘Eventful night this in the British Parliament! Once more King Jesus stands at an earthly tribunal, and they know Him not!'” (Memoir {1892 ed.}, p. 147).

M’Cheyne designed a widely used system for reading through the Bible in one year. The plan entails reading the New Testament and the Psalms through twice a year, and the Old Testament through once. This program was included (in a slightly modified form) in For the Love of God by D. A. Carson (ISBN 0851115896) and is recommended by several Bible publishers, such as the English Standard Version and the New English Translation.

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J. C. Ryle Sermon – Questions About The Lord’s Supper

A large video collection of classic hymns, contemporary Praise and Worship songs, and the works (audio books, devotional readings, and sermons) of men greatly used of God, such as: Charles Spurgeon, Jonathan Edwards, A.W. Tozer, A.W. Pink, John Owen, Oswald Chambers, Andrew Murray, E.M. Bounds, John Bunyan, George Whitefield, and many more, covering topics on many aspects of the Christian life. May your time spent here be blessed.

http://vid.io/x3F

J. C. Ryle Sermon – Questions About The Lord’s Supper

“A man ought to examine himself before he eats of the bread and drinks of the cup” (1 Corinthians 11:28)

J. C. Ryle playlist: http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=F5502DD37912A9C7

J. C. Ryle – (1816-1900), first Anglican bishop of Liverpool

John Charles Ryle was born at Macclesfield and was educated at Eton and at Christ Church, Oxford. He was a fine athlete who rowed and played Cricket for Oxford, where he took a first class degree in Greats and was offered a college fellowship (teaching position) which he declined. The son of a wealthy banker, he was destined for a career in politics before answering a call to ordained ministry.

He was spiritually awakened in 1838 while hearing Ephesians 2 read in church. He was ordained by Bishop Sumner at Winchester in 1842. After holding a curacy at Exbury in Hampshire, he became rector of St Thomas’s, Winchester (1843), rector of Helmingham, Suffolk (1844), vicar of Stradbroke (1861), honorary canon of Norwich (1872), and dean of Salisbury (1880). In 1880, at age 64, he became the first bishop of Liverpool, at the recommendation of Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli. He retired in 1900 at age 83 and died later the same year.

Ryle was a strong supporter of the evangelical school and a critic of Ritualism. Among his longer works are Christian Leaders of the Eighteenth Century (1869), Expository Thoughts on the Gospels (7 vols, 1856-69) and Principles for Churchmen (1884).

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Puritan Richard Baxter – Your Everlasting Comfort (Christian devotional)

A large video collection of classic hymns, contemporary Praise and Worship songs, and the works (audio books, devotional readings, and sermons) of men greatly used of God, such as: Charles Spurgeon, Jonathan Edwards, A.W. Tozer, A.W. Pink, John Owen, Oswald Chambers, Andrew Murray, E.M. Bounds, John Bunyan, George Whitefield, and many more, covering topics on many aspects of the Christian life. May your time spent here be blessed.

http://vid.io/x3F

Puritan Richard Baxter – Your Everlasting Comfort (Christian devotional)

Richard Baxter playlist: http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=353D9FC6791C59E2

Romans 8:38 For I am persuaded that neither death nor life, nor angels nor principalities nor powers, nor things present nor things to come, 39 nor height nor depth, nor any other created thing, shall be able to separate us from the love of God which is in Christ Jesus our Lord.

Richard Baxter – English puritan divine (1615-1691) was a prominent English churchman of the 1600s. He was a peacemaker who sought unity among Protestants, and yet he was a highly independent thinker and at the center of every major controversy in England during his lifetime.

Born in Rowton to parents who undervalued education, Baxter was largely self-taught. He eventually studied at a free school, then at royal court, where he became disgusted at what he saw as frivolity. He left to study divinity, and at age 23, he was ordained into the Church of England. Within the Anglican church, Baxter found common ground with the Puritans, a growing faction who opposed the church’s episcopacy and was itself breaking into factions. Baxter, for his part, did his best to avoid the disputes between Anglicans, Presbyterians, Congregationalists, and other denominations, even convincing local ministers to cooperate in some pastoral matters. “In necessary things, unity; in doubtful things, liberty; in all things, charity,” he was fond of saying.

The interest in cooperation was not due to a lack of conviction. On the contrary, Baxter was opinionated in his theology, which was not quite Separatist and not quite Conformist. Among his more than 200 works are long, controversial discourses on doctrine. Still, he believed society was a large family under a loving father, and in his theology, he tried to cut between the extremes. He eventually registered himself as “a mere Nonconformist” (“Nonconformist” was a technical term meaning “not Anglican”), breaking with the Church of England mainly because of the lack of power it gave parish clergy.

Baxter also found himself as a peacemaker during the English Civil Wars. He believed in monarchy, but a limited one. He served as a chaplain for the parliamentary army, but then helped to bring about the restoration of the king. Yet as a moderate, Baxter found himself the target of both extremes. He was still irritated with the episcopacy in 1660, when he was offered the bishopric of Hereford, so he declined it. As a result, he was barred from ecclesiastical office and not permitted to return to Kidderminster, nor was he allowed to preach. Between 1662 and 1688 (when James II was overthrown), he was persecuted and was imprisoned for 18 months, and he was forced to sell two extensive libraries. Still, he continued to preach: “I preached as never sure to preach again,” he wrote, “and as a dying man to dying men.”

Baxter became even better known for his prolific writing. His devotional classic The Saints’ Everlasting Rest was one of the most widely read books of the century. When asked what deviations should be permitted from the Anglican Book of Common Prayer, he created an entirely new one, called Reformed Liturgy, in two weeks. His Christian Directory contains over one million words. His autobiography and his pastoral guide, The Reformed Pastor, are still widely read today.

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Puritan Thomas Watson – To Cheer and to Revive a Sad Heart / Christian Devotional

A large video collection of classic hymns, contemporary Praise and Worship songs, and the works (audio books, devotional readings, and sermons) of men greatly used of God, such as: Charles Spurgeon, Jonathan Edwards, A.W. Tozer, A.W. Pink, John Owen, Oswald Chambers, Andrew Murray, E.M. Bounds, John Bunyan, George Whitefield, and many more, covering topics on many aspects of the Christian life. May your time spent here be blessed.

http://vid.io/x3F

Puritan Thomas Watson – To Cheer and to Revive a Sad Heart / Christian Devotional

Luke 22:19 And He took bread, gave thanks and broke it, and gave it to them, saying, “This is My body which is given for you; do this in remembrance of Me.”

Thomas Watson playlist: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL9B58A93B5F60F495

Link to my “Christian Devotional Readings” Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/ChristianDevotionalReadings

Thomas Watson – (ca. 1620-1686), English non-conformist Puritan preacher and author

Watson was educated at Emmanuel College, Cambridge, where he was noted for remarkably intense study. In 1646 he commenced a sixteen year pastorate at St. Stephen’s, Walbrook. He showed strong Presbyterian views during the civil war, with, however, an attachment to the king, and in 1651 he was imprisoned briefly with some other ministers for his share in Christopher Love’s plot to recall Charles II of England. He was released on June 30, 1652, and was formally reinstated as vicar of St. Stephen’s Walbrook.

Watson obtained great fame and popularity as a preacher until the Restoration, when he was ejected for nonconformity. Notwithstanding the rigor of the acts against dissenters, Watson continued to exercise his ministry privately as he found opportunity. Upon the Declaration of Indulgence in 1672 he obtained a license to preach at the great hall in Crosby House. After preaching there for several years, his health gave way, and he retired to Barnston, Essex, where he died suddenly while praying in secret. He was buried on 28 July 1686.

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The Wedding Feast! – Octavius Winslow

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