James Smith – Living Stones! (Christian devotional)

James Smith – Living Stones! (Christian devotional)

1 Peter 2:5 you also, like living stones, are being built into a spiritual house to be a holy priesthood, offering spiritual sacrifices acceptable to God through Jesus Christ.

James Smith playlist: http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=096D74E48C1F1243

The links to my recently released new album, “A Message of Hope.” The album is available on iTunes and Amazon:

https://itunes.apple.com/album/a-message-of-hope/id731510259

http://www.amazon.com/A-Message-Hope-Rich-Moore/dp/B00G4O5808/ref=sr_1_cc_2?s=aps&ie=UTF8&qid=1382586058&sr=1-2-catcorr&keywords=rich+moore+a+message+of+hope

Link to my “Christian Devotional Readings” Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Christian-Devotional-Readings/196846270398160?ref=hl

A Treasury of Ageless,
Sovereign Grace,
Devotional Writings http://www.gracegems.org/

James Smith was a predecessor of Charles Spurgeon at New Park Street Chapel in London from 1841 until 1850. Early on, Smith’s readings were even more popular than Spurgeon’s!

The habit of laying up a text of Scripture in the morning, to be meditated upon while engaged in the business of this world through the day—is both profitable and delightful. It is as a refreshing draught to a weary traveler!

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Fearless Devotion to Jesus Christ – Oswald Chambers

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John MacDuff – Chastening Love (Christian devotional)

John MacDuff – Chastening Love (Christian devotional)

Revelation 3:19 Those whom I love I rebuke and discipline. So be earnest and repent.

#Love #Revelation
JOHN MACDUFF (1818 – 1895)

“For sound doctrine, presented Scripturally
and devotionally, with its application to the
Christian life, you cannot go beyond MacDuff.”

“MacDuff writes popularly, yet he is by no
means shallow. For an hour’s pleasant and
holy reading, commend us to MacDuff!”
—Charles Spurgeon

Macduff, John Ross, D.D., second son of Alexander Macduff, of Bonhard, near Perth, was born at Bonhard, May 23, 1818. After studying at the University of Edinburgh, he became in 1842 parish minister of Kettins, Forfarshire, in 1849 of St. Madoes, Perthshire, and in 1855 of Sandyford, Glasgow. He received the degree of D.D. from the University of Glasgow in 1862, and about the same time also from the University of New York. He retired from pastoral work in 1871, lived at Chislehurst, Kent and died in 1887. He has published many practical and devotional works which have attained a wide circulation. In 1857 he was appointed by the General Assembly a member of their Hymnal Committee. His 31 hymns appeared in his Altar Stones, 1853, and were also included with his later poems in his The Gates of Praise, 1876.

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Christian Hymn Choir / Lyrics – Now Thank We All Our God

Christian Hymn Choir / Lyrics – Now Thank We All Our God

Christian Hymns playlist: http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=BD1B04EAC0152F4B

“Now thank we all our God,
With heart and hands and voices,
Who wondrous things hath done,
In whom His world rejoices…”

Lyrics:

Now thank we all our God,
With heart and hands and voices,
Who wondrous things hath done,
In whom His world rejoices;
Who from our mother’s arms
Hath blessed us on our way
With countless gifts of love,
And still is ours to-day.

O may this bounteous God
Through all our life be near us,
With ever joyful hearts
And blessed peace to cheer us;
And keep us in his grace,
And guide us when perplexed,
And free us from all ills
In this world and the next.

All praise and thanks to God
The Father now be given,
The son, and him who reigns,
With them in highest heaven,
The one eternal God,
Whom earth and heaven adore;
For thus it was, is now,
And shall be evermore.

Pastor Martin Rinkart served in the walled city of Eilenburg Saxony, during the horrors of the Thirty Years War of 1618-1648. Eilenberg became the refuge for political and military fugitives, but the result was overcrowding, and deadly pestilence and famine.. At the beginning of 1637, the year of the Great Pestilence, there were four ministers in Eilenburg,. but one abandoned his post for healthier areas and could not be persuaded to return. Pastor Rinkhart officiated at the funerals of the other two. During the height of the great pestilence in 1637, Rinkart was the only surviving pastor in Eilenberg, conducting as many as 50 funerals in a day. He performed more than 4000 funerals in that year, including that of his wife.

Pastor Rinckart knew that the Holy Spirit, given to Christians after sincere repentance and belief, is the very power that made the universe. That power, being personal, can take up residence inside Christians (Ephesians 3:20; John 14:23). Such a living hope made it possible for Pastor Rinckart and his tiny flock to endure.

Translated from the German”Nun danket alle Gott”, to English by Catherine Winkworth, 1856.

O give thanks unto the LORD; for He is good: because His mercy endureth for ever. Psalm:118:1

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Christian Hymn / Lyrics – Praise, My Soul, the King of Heaven (Choir)

Christian Hymn / Lyrics – Praise, My Soul, the King of Heaven (Choir)

Christian Hymns playlist: http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=BD1B04EAC0152F4B

Henry Francis Lyte wrote “Praise, My Soul, The King of Heaven” for his congregation at Lower Brixham in Devon, England. The hymn was first published in 1834, among a collection of three hundred hymns entitled “Spirit of the Psalms.”

Unlike translations of the Psalms-commonly used in Psalters of that time-or paraphrases like those written by Isaac Watts, “Spirit of the Psalms” contained hymns that were simply inspired by the Psalms. A part of this collection, “Praise, My Soul, The King of Heaven” captured the “spirit” of Psalm 103.

In the hymn, Lyte succinctly states each of the psalm’s points: “Who forgives all your iniquities, who heals all your diseases, who redeems your life from destruction, who crowns you with loving kindness and tender mercies” (v. 3-4) become “ransomed, healed, restored, forgiven.” And enlarging on the palmist’s declaration that God is slow to anger and will not always chide (v. 8-9), Lyte declares, “Slow to chide and swift to bless.”

In his refrain, Lyte picked up on the primary theme of the Psalm: “Praise Him, praise him.” Today, some hymnals have changed these words to “Alleluia!” But either refrain fittingly calls us to join with all creation in praise of the King.

Queen Elizabeth II chose this hymn to be sung as the processional at her wedding. Interestingly, this was on November 20, 1947, exactly one hundred years after the death of Henry Francis Lyte.

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Puritan Joseph Alleine – To the Beloved People the Inhabitants of the Town of Taunton

Puritan Joseph Alleine – To the Beloved People the Inhabitants of the Town of Taunton

http://www.puritanaudiobooks.net

Joseph Alleine playlist: http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=0664AB53EC30F52C

Romans 7:14 For we know that the Law is spiritual, but I am of flesh, sold into bondage to sin.

Joseph Alleine (1634-1668)
Excerpt from Meet the Puritans
by Dr. Joel Beeke and Randall J. Pederson

Born at Devizes, Wiltshire, early in 1634, Joseph Alleine loved and served the Lord from childhood. A contemporary witness identified 1645 as the year of Alleine’s “setting forth in the Christian race.” From eleven years of age onward, “the whole course of his youth was an even-spun thread of godly conversation.” When his elder brother Edward, a clergyman, died, Joseph begged that he might be educated to take Edward’s place in the ministry of the church. He entered Oxford at age sixteen and sat at the feet of such great divines as John Owen and Thomas Goodwin. Alleine began his studies at Lincoln College in 1649. Two years later, he became a scholar of Corpus Christi College, where the faculty was, in general, more thoroughly Puritan than at Lincoln. Alleine studied long hours, often depriving himself of sleep and food. He graduated from Oxford in 1653 with a Bachelor of Arts degree and became a tutor and chaplain of Corpus Christi. He also devoted much time to preaching to prisoners in the county jail, visiting the sick, and ministering to the poor.

In 1655, Alleine accepted the invitation of George Newton, vicar of St. Mary Magdalene Church, Taunton, Somerset, to become Newton’s assistant. Taunton, a wool-manufacturing city of some 20,000, was a Puritan stronghold. Shortly after moving to Taunton, Alleine married his cousin, Theodosia Alleine, whose father, Richard Alleine, was minister of Batcombe, Somerset (see below). She was an active woman who feared God deeply. Early in their marriage, she ran a home school of about fifty scholars, half of them boarders. She would later serve as her husband’s biographer after his death. Alleine rose early, devoting the time between four and eight o’clock in the morning to the exercises of private worship. His wife recalled that he “would be much troubled if he heard smiths or other craftsmen at work at their trades, before he was at communion with God: saying to me often, ‘How this noise shames me! Doth not my Master deserve more than theirs?’ ”

His ministry in Taunton as preacher and pastor was very fruitful. Richard Baxter recalled Alleine’s “great ministerial skillfulness in the public explication and application of the Scriptures—so melting, so convincing, so powerful.” Alleine was also an excellent teacher, devoting much time to instructing his people, using the Shorter Catechism. He was a passionate evangelist. One contemporary wrote, “He was infinitely and insatiably greedy of the conversion of souls, wherein he had no small success.

Ejected for nonconformity in 1662, Alleine took the opportunity to increase his public labors, believing that his remaining time was short. He preached on average one or two sermons every day for nine months until he was arrested and cast into the Ilchester prison. The night before, Alleine had preached and prayed with his people for three hours and had declared, “Glory be to God that hath accounted me worthy to suffer for His gospel!”

Alleine’s prison cell became his pulpit as he continued to preach to his people through the prison bars. He also wrote numerous pastoral letters and theological articles. Released on May 20, 1664, after about a year in prison, he resumed his forbidden ministry until arrested again on July 10, 1665 for holding a conventicle. Once more released from prison, his remaining time was “full of troubles and persecutions nobly borne.” He returned to Taunton in February, 1668, where he became very ill. Nine months later, at age thirty-four, weary from hard work and suffering, Alleine died in full assurance of faith, praising God and saying, “Christ is mine, and I am His— His by covenant.”

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Kenneth Stewart Sermon – Work Out Your Salvation

Kenneth Stewart Sermon – Work Out Your Salvation

Philippians 2:12 Therefore, my beloved, as you have always obeyed, not as in my presence only, but now much more in my absence, work out your own salvation with fear and trembling; 13 for it is God who works in you both to will and to do for His good pleasure.

Kenneth Stewart Sermons playlist: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLzOwqed_gET1oeBpxhSLRurtYEDNq4-y9

http://glasgowrpcs.org/

Link to my “Christian Devotional Readings” Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Christian-Devotional-Readings/196846270398160?ref=hl

http://www.sermonaudio.com

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