A Sovereign Lord – Dr. Martyn Lloyd-Jones Sermon

The living message of Scripture; what is a miracle? the whole man (mind; body and spirit) to be an expression of the glory of God; Christianity; an intimate relationship with a person; Mary; His mother; and the sin of presumption; the error of Roman Catholicism is an insult to Christ.

A Sovereign Lord – Dr. Martyn Lloyd-Jones Sermon

John 2:3 When the wine was gone, Jesus’ mother said to him, “They have no more wine.” 4 “Woman, why do you involve me?” Jesus replied. “My hour has not yet come.” 5 His mother said to the servants, “Do whatever he tells you.”

Dr. Martyn Lloyd-Jones playlist: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=…

David Martyn Lloyd-Jones (20 December 1899 — 1 March 1981) was a Welsh Protestant minister, preacher and medical doctor who was influential in the Reformed wing of the British evangelical movement in the 20th century. For almost 30 years, he was the minister of Westminster Chapel in London.

Thank you to the Martyn Lloyd-Jones Recordings Trust for permission to use this audio sermon. http://www.mljtrust.org/

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Please watch: “FULL ALBUM Christian Praise Worship Songs 2013 – A Message of Hope”
➨ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jb_Vl…
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The Influence of Health and Disease on Religious Experience – Joseph H. Jones

The Influence of Health and Disease on Religious Experience – Joseph H. Jones

Joseph H. Jones was the pastor of the 6th Presbyterian Church in Philadelphia. He also is the author of the official biography of Ashbel Green. He wrote a book on revival at New Brunswick NJ in 1837.

Christian Experience—Religious frames closely allied to what is called the ” constitution”—Idiosyncrasies of nature not merged in grace—Remark of the astrologers concerning Cyrus—Example of Simon Peter—of Paul and John— of Melancthon—of Martin Luther—Rev. Timothy Rogers—Christianity made to suffer from the physical sufferings of its professors—Their spiritual fluctuations produced by physical causes .

Four cases of mental disorder within the sphere of the author’s pastoral experience—The mistake of imputing to Satanic agency what is dependent on bodily disease—Case of the wife of Rev. John Newton—Case of John Bunyan—of Martin Luther—Opinion of Richard Baxter— Injurious influence on the mind ascribed to Calvinism—Opinion of a writer in the Encyclopedia Britannica—of Esquirol—Macaulay—Haley’s insinuation in relation to Cowper unwarranted— Judicious remark of Dr. Cheyne—Case of an injured wife in London.

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Prayer – Bishop J. C. Ryle Sermon

Prayer – Bishop J. C. Ryle Sermon

Luke 18:1 Then Jesus told his disciples a parable to show them that they should always pray and not give up.

1 Timothy 2:8 Therefore I want the men everywhere to pray, lifting up holy hands without anger or disputing.

J. C. Ryle playlist: http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=F5502DD37912A9C7

J. C. Ryle – (1816-1900), first Anglican bishop of Liverpool

John Charles Ryle was born at Macclesfield and was educated at Eton and at Christ Church, Oxford. He was a fine athlete who rowed and played Cricket for Oxford, where he took a first class degree in Greats and was offered a college fellowship (teaching position) which he declined. The son of a wealthy banker, he was destined for a career in politics before answering a call to ordained ministry.

He was spiritually awakened in 1838 while hearing Ephesians 2 read in church. He was ordained by Bishop Sumner at Winchester in 1842. After holding a curacy at Exbury in Hampshire, he became rector of St Thomas’s, Winchester (1843), rector of Helmingham, Suffolk (1844), vicar of Stradbroke (1861), honorary canon of Norwich (1872), and dean of Salisbury (1880). In 1880, at age 64, he became the first bishop of Liverpool, at the recommendation of Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli. He retired in 1900 at age 83 and died later the same year.

Ryle was a strong supporter of the evangelical school and a critic of Ritualism. Among his longer works are Christian Leaders of the Eighteenth Century (1869), Expository Thoughts on the Gospels (7 vols, 1856-69) and Principles for Churchmen (1884).

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Please watch: “FULL ALBUM Christian Praise Worship Songs 2013 – A Message of Hope”
➨ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jb_VlgldVpA
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Of Meditating on the Future Life – John Calvin / Institutes of the Christian Religion

Of Meditating on the Future Life – John Calvin / Institutes of the Christian Religion

Titus 2:13 looking for the blessed hope and glorious appearing of our great God and Savior Jesus Christ

John Calvin / Calvinism playlist: http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list…

John Calvin – (1509-1564), French reformer and theologian

Born July 10, 1509 in Noyon, France, Jean Calvin was raised in a staunch Roman Catholic family. The local bishop employed Calvin’s father as an administrator in the town’s cathedral. The father, in turn, wanted John to become a priest. Because of close ties with the bishop and his noble family, John’s playmates and classmates in Noyon (and later in Paris) were aristocratic and culturally influential in his early life.

At the age of 14 Calvin went to Paris to study at the College de Marche in preparation for university study. His studies consisted of seven subjects: grammar, rhetoric, logic, arithmetic, geometry, astronomy, and music. Toward the end of 1523 Calvin transferred to the more famous College Montaigu. While in Paris he changed his name to its Latin form, Ioannis Calvinus, which in French became Jean Calvin. During this time, Calvin’s education was paid for in part by income from a couple of small parishes. So although the new theological teachings of individuals like Luther and Jacques Lefevre d’Etaples were spreading throughout Paris, Calvin was closely tied to the Roman Church. However, by 1527 Calvin had developed friendships with individuals who were reform-minded. These contacts set the stage for Calvin’s eventual switch to the Reformed faith. Also, at this time Calvin’s father advised him to study law rather than theology.

By 1528 Calvin moved to Orleans to study civil law. The following years found Calvin studying in various places and under various scholars, as he received a humanist education. By 1532 Calvin finished his law studies and also published his first book, a commentary on De Clementia by the Roman philosopher, Seneca. The following year Calvin fled Paris because of contacts with individuals who through lectures and writings opposed the Roman Catholic Church. It is thought that in 1533 Calvin experienced the sudden and unexpected conversion that he writes about in his foreword to his commentary on the Psalms.

For the next three years, Calvin lived in various places outside of France under various names. He studied on his own, preached, and began work on his first edition of the Institutes of the Christian Religion, an instant best seller. By 1536 Calvin had disengaged himself from the Roman Catholic Church and made plans to permanently leave France and go to Strasbourg. However, war had broken out between Francis I and Charles V, so Calvin decided to make a one-night detour to Geneva.

But Calvin’s fame in Geneva preceded him. Farel, a local reformer, invited him to stay in Geneva and threatened him with God’s anger if he did not. Thus began a long, difficult, yet ultimately fruitful relationship with that city. He began as a lecturer and preacher, but by 1538 was asked to leave because of theological conflicts. He went to Strasbourg until 1541. His stay there as a pastor to French refugees was so peaceful and happy that when in 1541 the Council of Geneva requested that he return to Geneva, he was emotionally torn. He wanted to stay in Strasbourg but felt a responsibility to return to Geneva. He did so and remained in Geneva until his death May 27, 1564. Those years were filled with lecturing, preaching, and the writing of commentaries, treatises, and various editions of the Institutes of the Christian Religion.

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Please watch: “FULL ALBUM Christian Praise Worship Songs 2013 – A Message of Hope”
➨ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jb_Vl…
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The Promises of God – John MacDuff (Christian devotional)

The Promises of God – John MacDuff (Christian devotional)

2 Corinthians 1:20 For no matter how many promises God has made, they are “Yes” in Christ. And so through him the “Amen” is spoken by us to the glory of God.

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John MacDuff playlist: http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=229C974C428D7BE8

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JOHN MACDUFF (1818 – 1895)

“For sound doctrine, presented Scripturally
and devotionally, with its application to the
Christian life, you cannot go beyond MacDuff.”

“MacDuff writes popularly, yet he is by no
means shallow. For an hour’s pleasant and
holy reading, commend us to MacDuff!”
—Charles Spurgeon

Macduff, John Ross, D.D., second son of Alexander Macduff, of Bonhard, near Perth, was born at Bonhard, May 23, 1818. After studying at the University of Edinburgh, he became in 1842 parish minister of Kettins, Forfarshire, in 1849 of St. Madoes, Perthshire, and in 1855 of Sandyford, Glasgow. He received the degree of D.D. from the University of Glasgow in 1862, and about the same time also from the University of New York. He retired from pastoral work in 1871, lived at Chislehurst, Kent and died in 1887. He has published many practical and devotional works which have attained a wide circulation. In 1857 he was appointed by the General Assembly a member of their Hymnal Committee. His 31 hymns appeared in his Altar Stones, 1853, and were also included with his later poems in his The Gates of Praise, 1876.

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Please watch: “FULL ALBUM Christian Praise Worship Songs 2013 – A Message of Hope”
➨ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jb_VlgldVpA
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Miracles that Follow the Plow – A. W. Tozer Sermon

Miracles that Follow the Plow – A. W. Tozer Sermon

Hosea 10:12 “Sow to yourselves in righteousness, reap in mercy; break up your fallow ground: for it is time to seek the LORD, till he come and rain righteousness upon you.”

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Better to rot in Prison! – J. R. Miller / Christian Devotional

Better to rot in Prison! – J. R. Miller / Christian Devotional

Genesis 39:9 “No one is greater in this house than I am. My master has withheld nothing from me except you, because you are his wife. How then could I do such a wicked thing and sin against God?”

Genesis 39:19 When his master heard the story his wife told him, saying, “This is how your slave treated me,” he burned with anger. 20 Joseph’s master took him and put him in prison, the place where the king’s prisoners were confined. But while Joseph was there in the prison

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