Persecutions in PERSIA – John Foxe / Book of Martyrs

Persecutions in PERSIA – John Foxe / Book of Martyrs

The Actes and Monuments, popularly known as Foxe’s Book of Martyrs, is a work of Protestant history and martyrology by Protestant English historian John Foxe (1516/17 – 18 April 1587), first published in 1563 by John Day. It includes a polemical account of the sufferings of Protestants under the Catholic Church, with particular emphasis on England and Scotland. The book was highly influential in those countries and helped shape lasting popular notions of Catholicism there. The book went through four editions in Foxe’s lifetime and a number of later editions and abridgements, including some that specifically reduced the text to a Book of Martyrs.

▶️SUBSCRIBE: https://www.youtube.com/user/stack45ny
▶️After subscribing, click on NOTIFICATION BELL to be notified of new uploads.
▶️SUPPORT CHANNEL: https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_donations&business=RB72ANM8DJL2S&lc=US&item_name=stack45ny&currency_code=USD&bn=PP%2dDonationsBF%3abtn_donateCC_LG%2egif%3aNonHosted

▶️Follow me on https://www.minds.com/RichNY
▶️Battle for God and His Truth: http://battleforgodstruth.tumblr.com/
▶️My WordPress blog: https://sermonsandsongsdotorg.com/

Please watch: “A Call to Separation – A. W. Pink Christian Audio Books / Don’t be Unequally Yoked / Be Ye Separate”
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CBDg7u21cKY

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment

Persecutions in Italy under the Papacy – John Foxe / Book of Martyrs

Persecutions in Italy under the Papacy – John Foxe / Book of Martyrs

The Actes and Monuments, popularly known as Foxe’s Book of Martyrs, is a work of Protestant history and martyrology by Protestant English historian John Foxe (1516/17 – 18 April 1587), first published in 1563 by John Day. It includes a polemical account of the sufferings of Protestants under the Catholic Church, with particular emphasis on England and Scotland. The book was highly influential in those countries and helped shape lasting popular notions of Catholicism there. The book went through four editions in Foxe’s lifetime and a number of later editions and abridgements, including some that specifically reduced the text to a Book of Martyrs.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Servant of Sin – Donald Cargill / Covenanter Pastor (1619 – 1681)

Donald Cargill (1619 – 27 July 1681) was a Scottish Covenanter who worked to uphold the principles of the National Covenant of 1638 and Solemn League and Covenant of 1643 to establish and defend Presbyterianism.

After the death of Richard Cameron, Donald Cargill was the only field preacher left in Scotland. Cargill was born in 1627. He went to university in St Andrews where he read and re-read the books of John Knox and Andrew Melville. However the biggest influence on his life was his tutor, Samuel Rutherford. In 1655 he became minister of the Barony Church in Glasgow.

Two years after the Restoration of Charles II Cargill got into trouble for preaching against the king and had to go into hiding. He had to go into hiding, but kept preaching in the fields. After the Covenanters’ victory at Drumclog, Cargill rushed to join those preparing to fight at Bothwell Bridge. Cargill was badly wounded in the battle and left for dead. However, he survived, went to Holland for a while, and then came back to join Richard Cameron in preaching in the fields throughout Scotland.

Cargill preached Cameron’s funeral service, and then held a massive meeting at Torwood where in the name of Jesus Christ he excommunicated the king, Charles II – the highest punishment of the church.

The government now became more determined to catch Cargill than ever, and offered a large amount of money to anyone who would catch him, dead or alive. He was finally captured in July 1681, found guilty of treason and hanged in Edinburgh.

Just before he died, Cargill wrote: “This is the most joyful day that I ever saw in my pilgrimage on earth. My joy is now begun, which I see shall never be interrupted.” He had complete confidence that all his sins had been forgiven by Christ, and so he was not afraid to die. His calmness when facing death had a big impact on those who were watching, especially 18 year-old James Renwick.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Prayer & Practical Christianity – John Kid (Martyr) Sermon

Prayer & Practical Christianity – John Kid (Martyr) Sermon

Lastly, I do further bear my Testimony to the Cross of Christ, and bless him that ever he counted me worthy to appear for him in such a lot as this: Glory to him that ever I heard tell of him, and that ever he fell upon such a method of dealing with me as this, and therefore let none that loves Christ and his Righteous Cause be offended in me.

And as I have lived in the faith of this, that the three Kingdoms are married Lands, so I die in the faith of it, that there will be a resurrection of his Name, Word, Cause, and of all his interest therein, though I dare not determine the time when, nor the manner how, but leave all these things to the infinitely wise God, who has done, and will do all things well. Oh that he would return to this Land again, to repair our breaches, and take away our back sliding, and appear for his work: Oh that he were pacified towards us; Oh that he would pass by Scotland once again, and make our time a time of Love, Come Lord Jesus, come quickly. Himself hasten it in his own time and way. The Lord is my light and life, my joy, my song, and my salvation; the God of his chosen be my Mercy this day, and the inriching comforts of the holy Ghost keep up and carry me fair through, to the Glory of his Grace, to the edification of his people, and my own eternal advantage. Amen.

John Kid.

August, 14th. 1679.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

A Silent Church Amidst A Sinful Nation – E. A. Johnston Sermon

A Silent Church Amidst A Sinful Nation – E. A. Johnston Sermon

Isaiah 5:20 New King James Version (NKJV) 20 Woe to those who call evil good, and good evil; Who put darkness for light, and light for darkness; Who put bitter for sweet, and sweet for bitter!

▶️SUBSCRIBE: https://www.youtube.com/user/stack45ny

▶️After subscribing, click on NOTIFICATION BELL to be notified of new uploads. ▶️SUPPORT CHANNEL: https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr…

▶️Follow me on https://www.bitchute.com/channel/chri…

▶️Follow me on https://www.minds.com/RichNY

▶️Battle for God and His Truth: http://battleforgodstruth.tumblr.com/

▶️My WordPress blog: https://sermonsandsongsdotorg.com/

E. A. Johnston Ph.D., D.B.S., is a fellow of the Stephen Olford Center for Biblical Preaching and is an evangelist and author of eighteen books including, “A Heart Awake The Authorized Biography of J. Sidlow Baxter” (Baker Books); “George Whitefield A Definitive Biography in Two Volumes (Revival Literature); “God’s Hitchhike Evangelist The Biography of Rolfe Barnard (Revival Literature). Dr. Johnston is the founder of Evangelism Awakening, a gospel outreach and preacher training program based on the great doctrines of the bible which were mightily used in past times of spiritual awakening and revival. The presentation of the gospel in Evangelism Awakening is the gospel of George Whitefield, Jonathan Edwards, Charles Spurgeon, and Asahel Nettleton. It is a presentation of the full counsel of God which proclaims: Ruin, Redemption, Repentance, and Regeneration. Dr. Johnston’s ministry is toward revival in the church and spiritual awakening in the world.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Substitution – Charles Spurgeon Sermon

Substitution – Charles Spurgeon Sermon

2 Corinthians 5:21 English Standard Version (ESV)
21 For our sake he made him to be sin who knew no sin, so that in him we might become the righteousness of God.

Charles Spurgeon Sermon playlist: Charles Spurgeon Sermon playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list…

Charles Haddon (C.H.) Spurgeon (June 19, 1834 January 31, 1892) was a British Reformed Baptist preacher who remains highly influential among Christians of different denominations, among whom he is still known as the “Prince of Preachers.” In his lifetime, Spurgeon preached to around 10,000,000 people, often up to 10 times a week at different places. His sermons have been translated into many languages. Spurgeon was the pastor of the New Park Street Chapel in London for 38 years. In 1857, he started a charity organization called Spurgeon’s which now works globally. He also founded Spurgeon’s College, which was named after him after his death.

Spurgeon was a prolific author of many types of works including sermons, an autobiography, a commentary, books on prayer, a devotional, a magazine, and more. Many sermons were transcribed as he spoke and were translated into many languages during his lifetime. Arguably, no other author, Christian or otherwise, has more material in print than C. H. Spurgeon.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Comparison Between the False Church and the True – John Calvin / Institutes

Comparison Between the False Church and the True – John Calvin / Institutes

John Calvin – (1509-1564) French reformer and theologian

At the age of 14 Calvin went to Paris to study at the College de Marche in preparation for university study. His studies consisted of seven subjects: grammar, rhetoric, logic, arithmetic, geometry, astronomy, and music. Toward the end of 1523 Calvin transferred to the more famous College Montaigu. While in Paris he changed his name to its Latin form, Ioannis Calvinus, which in French became Jean Calvin. During this time, Calvin’s education was paid for in part by income from a couple of small parishes. So although the new theological teachings of individuals like Luther and Jacques Lefevre d’Etaples were spreading throughout Paris, Calvin was closely tied to the Roman Church. However, by 1527 Calvin had developed friendships with individuals who were reform-minded. These contacts set the stage for Calvin’s eventual switch to the Reformed faith. Also, at this time Calvin’s father advised him to study law rather than theology.

By 1528 Calvin moved to Orleans to study civil law. The following years found Calvin studying in various places and under various scholars, as he received a humanist education. By 1532 Calvin finished his law studies and also published his first book, a commentary on De Clementia by the Roman philosopher, Seneca. The following year Calvin fled Paris because of contacts with individuals who through lectures and writings opposed the Roman Catholic Church. It is thought that in 1533 Calvin experienced the sudden and unexpected conversion that he writes about in his foreword to his commentary on the Psalms.

For the next three years, Calvin lived in various places outside of France under various names. He studied on his own, preached, and began work on his first edition of the Institutes of the Christian Religion, an instant best seller. By 1536 Calvin had disengaged himself from the Roman Catholic Church and made plans to permanently leave France and go to Strasbourg. However, war had broken out between Francis I and Charles V, so Calvin decided to make a one-night detour to Geneva.

But Calvin’s fame in Geneva preceded him. Farel, a local reformer, invited him to stay in Geneva and threatened him with God’s anger if he did not. Thus began a long, difficult, yet ultimately fruitful relationship with that city. He began as a lecturer and preacher, but by 1538 was asked to leave because of theological conflicts. He went to Strasbourg until 1541. His stay there as a pastor to French refugees was so peaceful and happy that when in 1541 the Council of Geneva requested that he return to Geneva, he was emotionally torn. He wanted to stay in Strasbourg but felt a responsibility to return to Geneva. He did so and remained in Geneva until his death May 27, 1564. Those years were filled with lecturing, preaching, and the writing of commentaries, treatises, and various editions of the Institutes of the Christian Religion.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment