Consolation Proportionate to Spiritual Sufferings – Charles Spurgeon Sermon

“For as the sufferings of Christ abound in us, so our consolation also abounds through Christ.” 2 Corinthians 1:5

Consolation Proportionate to Spiritual Sufferings – Charles Spurgeon Sermon

“For as the sufferings of Christ abound in us, so our consolation also abounds through Christ.” 2 Corinthians 1:5

Charles Haddon (C.H.) Spurgeon (June 19, 1834 January 31, 1892) was a British Reformed Baptist preacher who remains highly influential among Christians of different denominations, among whom he is still known as the “Prince of Preachers.” In his lifetime, Spurgeon preached to around 10,000,000 people, often up to 10 times a week at different places. His sermons have been translated into many languages. Spurgeon was the pastor of the New Park Street Chapel in London for 38 years. In 1857, he started a charity organization called Spurgeon’s which now works globally. He also founded Spurgeon’s College, which was named after him after his death.

Spurgeon was a prolific author of many types of works including sermons, an autobiography, a commentary, books on prayer, a devotional, a magazine, and more. Many sermons were transcribed as he spoke and were translated into many languages during his lifetime. Arguably, no other author, Christian or otherwise, has more material in print than C.H. Spurgeon.

Jesus Came to Save Sinners: An Earnest Conversation with Those Who Long for Salvation and Eternal Life https://amzn.to/2RtbA9o

Spurgeon’s Sorrows: Realistic Hope for those who suffer from depression https://amzn.to/2RdqGPU

All-new Kindle Oasis – Now with adjustable warm light – Wi-Fi + Free Cellular Connectivity, 32 GB, Graphite https://amzn.to/33CRjjX

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The Biblical Doctrine of the Trinity – Benjamin B. Warfield

The Trinity is a revealed doctrine NOT found by natural reason. Man searches but hasn’t found the deepest things of God.

The Biblical Doctrine of the Trinity – Benjamin B. Warfield

The Trinity is a revealed doctrine NOT found by natural reason. Man searches but hasn’t found the deepest things of God.

Matthew 28:19 English Standard Version (ESV)
19 Go therefore and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in[a] the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit

Kindle Oasis – Now with adjustable warm light https://amzn.to/33CRjjX

The Person and Work of the Holy Spirit, by Benjamin B. Warfield https://amzn.to/2RpiZXg

The Inspiration and Authority of the Bible, by Benjamin B. Warfield https://amzn.to/2YmLG8M

Benjamin Breckinridge Warfield (November 5, 1851 February 16, 1921) was the principal of Princeton Seminary from 1887 to 1921. Some conservative Presbyterians consider him to be the last of the great Princeton theologians before the split in 1929 that formed Westminster Seminary and the Orthodox Presbyterian Church.

Warfield was born near Lexington, Kentucky on November 5, 1851. His parents were William and Mary Cabell (Breckinridge) Warfield, originally from Virginia and quite wealthy. His maternal grandfather was the Presbyterian preacher Robert Jefferson Breckinridge (1800-1871), the son of John Breckinridge, a former United States Senator and Attorney General. Warfield’s uncle was John C. Breckinridge, the fourteenth Vice President of the United States, and a Confederate general in the American Civil War.

For a short time in 1876 he preached in Presbyterian churches in Concord, Kentucky and Dayton, Ohio as a “supply pastor” — the latter church calling him to be their ordained minister (which he politely refused). In late 1876 Warfield and his new wife moved to Germany where he studied under Ernst Luthardt and Franz Delitzsch. Warfield was the assistant pastor of First Presbyterian Church in Baltimore, Maryland for a short time. Then he became an instructor at Western Theological Seminary, which is now called Pittsburgh Theological Seminary. He was ordained on April 26, 1879.

In 1881 Warfield wrote a joint article with A. A. Hodge on the inspiration of the Bible. It drew attention because of its scholarly and forceful defense of the inerrancy of the Bible. In many of his writings, Warfield attempted to demonstrate that the doctrine of Biblical inerrancy was simply orthodox Christian teaching, and not merely a concept invented in the nineteenth century. His passion was to refute the liberal element within Presbyterianism and within Christianity at large.

Throughout his life, he continued to write books and articles, which are still widely read today (and listened to!).

“If such be the value and use of doctrine, the systematic theologian is preeminently a preacher of the gospel; and the end of his work is obviously not merely the logical arrangement of the truths which come under his hand, but the moving of men, through their power, to love God with all their hearts and their neighbors as themselves; to choose their portion with the Saviour of their souls; to find and hold Him precious; and to recognize and yield to the sweet influences of the Holy Spirit whom He has sent. . . . For this he needs to be suffused at all times with a sense of the unspeakable worth of the revelation which lies before him as the source of his material, and with the personal bearings of its separate truths on his own heart and life; he needs to have had and to be having a full, rich, and deep religious experience of the great doctrines with which he deals; he needs to be living close to his God, to be resting always on the bosom of his Redeemer, to be filled at all times with the manifest influences of the Holy Spirit. The student of systematic theology needs a very sensitive religious nature, a most thoroughly consecrated heart, and an outpouring of the Holy Ghost upon him, such as will fill him with that spiritual discernment, without which all native intellect is in vain. He needs to be not merely a student, not merely a thinker, not merely a systematizer, not merely a teacher — he needs to be like the beloved disciple himself in the highest, truest, and holiest sense, a divine.”

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Hope for the Backslider – Charles Spurgeon Sermon

“Poor backslider! here is a word of comfort for you. If you know your sins and hate them, let me comfort you. You art not dead!”

Hope for the Backslider – Charles Spurgeon Sermon

Charles Haddon (C.H.) Spurgeon (June 19, 1834 January 31, 1892) was a British Reformed Baptist preacher who remains highly influential among Christians of different denominations, among whom he is still known as the “Prince of Preachers.” In his lifetime, Spurgeon preached to around 10,000,000 people, often up to 10 times a week at different places. His sermons have been translated into many languages. Spurgeon was the pastor of the New Park Street Chapel in London for 38 years. In 1857, he started a charity organization called Spurgeon’s which now works globally. He also founded Spurgeon’s College, which was named after him after his death.

Spurgeon was a prolific author of many types of works including sermons, an autobiography, a commentary, books on prayer, a devotional, a magazine, and more. Many sermons were transcribed as he spoke and were translated into many languages during his lifetime. Arguably, no other author, Christian or otherwise, has more material in print than C.H. Spurgeon.

“Poor backslider! here is a word of comfort for you. If you know your sins and hate them, let me comfort you. You art not dead!”

Jesus Came to Save Sinners: An Earnest Conversation with Those Who Long for Salvation and Eternal Life https://amzn.to/2RtbA9o

Spurgeon’s Sorrows: Realistic Hope for those who suffer from depression https://amzn.to/2RdqGPU

All-new Kindle Oasis – Now with adjustable warm light – Wi-Fi + Free Cellular Connectivity, 32 GB, Graphite https://amzn.to/33CRjjX

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The Way of Salvation – Charles Spurgeon Sermon

“And there is salvation in no one else, for there is no other name under heaven given among men by which we must be saved.” Acts 4:12

“And there is salvation in no one else, for there is no other name under heaven given among men by which we must be saved.” Acts 4:12 English Standard Version (ESV)

The Way of Salvation – Charles Spurgeon Sermon

Jesus Came to Save Sinners: An Earnest Conversation with Those Who Long for Salvation and Eternal Life https://amzn.to/2RtbA9o

Spurgeon’s Sorrows: Realistic Hope for those who suffer from depression https://amzn.to/2RdqGPU

All-new Kindle Oasis – Now with adjustable warm light – Wi-Fi + Free Cellular Connectivity, 32 GB, Graphite https://amzn.to/33CRjjX

Charles Haddon (C.H.) Spurgeon (June 19, 1834 January 31, 1892) was a British Reformed Baptist preacher who remains highly influential among Christians of different denominations, among whom he is still known as the “Prince of Preachers.” In his lifetime, Spurgeon preached to around 10,000,000 people, often up to 10 times a week at different places. His sermons have been translated into many languages. Spurgeon was the pastor of the New Park Street Chapel in London for 38 years. In 1857, he started a charity organization called Spurgeon’s which now works globally. He also founded Spurgeon’s College, which was named after him after his death.

Spurgeon was a prolific author of many types of works including sermons, an autobiography, a commentary, books on prayer, a devotional, a magazine, and more. Many sermons were transcribed as he spoke and were translated into many languages during his lifetime. Arguably, no other author, Christian or otherwise, has more material in print than C.H. Spurgeon.

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Giving Place to the Devil – A. W. Pink / Studies in the Scriptures / Christian Audio Books

Giving Place to the Devil – A. W. Pink / Studies in the Scriptures / Christian Audio Books

“Neither give place to the devil.” Eph 4:27

Studies in the Scriptures – A. W. Pink Video Playlist:
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLzOwqed_gET0_NzliRVRAvR1FKgzrjsec

Arthur Walkington Pink (1886-1952) evangelist and Biblical scholar

Pink was born in Nottingham, England on April 1, 1886 and became a Christian in his early 20’s. Though born to Christian parents, prior to conversion he migrated into a Theosophical society (an occult gnostic group popular in England during that time), and quickly rose in prominence within their ranks. His conversion came from his father’s patient admonitions from Scripture. It was the verse, Proverbs 14:12, ‘there is a way which seems right to a man, but its end is the way of death,’ which particularly struck his heart and compelled him to renounce Theosophy and follow Jesus.

Desiring to grow in knowledge of the Bible, Pink immigrated to the United States to study at Moody Bible Institute. In 1916 he married Vera E. Russell, who was from Kentucky. However, he left after just two months for Colorado, then California, then Britain. From 1925 to 1928 he served in Australia, including as pastor of two congregations from 1926 to 1928, when he returned to England, and to the United States the following year. He eventually pastored churches Colorado, California, Kentucky and South Carolina.

In 1922 he started a monthly magazine entitled Studies in Scriptures which circulated among English-speaking Christians worldwide, though only to a relatively small circulation list of around 1,000.

In 1934 Pink returned to England, and within a few years turned his Christian service to writing books and pamphlets. Pink died in Stornoway, Scotland on July 15, 1952. The cause of death was anemia.

After Pink’s death, his works were republished by the Banner of Truth Trust and reached a much wider audience as a result. Biographer Iain Murray observes of Pink, “the widespread circulation of his writings after his death made him one of the most influential evangelical authors in the second half of the twentieth century.” His writing sparked a revival of expository preaching and focused readers’ hearts on biblical living.

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One Antidote for Many Ills – Charles Spurgeon Sermon

One Antidote for Many Ills – Charles Spurgeon Sermon

Psalm 80:19 New King James Version (NKJV)
19 Restore us, O Lord God of hosts;
Cause Your face to shine,
And we shall be saved!

Charles Haddon (C.H.) Spurgeon (June 19, 1834 January 31, 1892) was a British Reformed Baptist preacher who remains highly influential among Christians of different denominations, among whom he is still known as the “Prince of Preachers.” In his lifetime, Spurgeon preached to around 10,000,000 people, often up to 10 times a week at different places. His sermons have been translated into many languages. Spurgeon was the pastor of the New Park Street Chapel in London for 38 years. In 1857, he started a charity organization called Spurgeon’s which now works globally.

He also founded Spurgeon’s College, which was named after him after his death. Spurgeon was a prolific author of many types of works including sermons, an autobiography, a commentary, books on prayer, a devotional, a magazine, and more. Many sermons were transcribed as he spoke and were translated into many languages during his lifetime. Arguably, no other author, Christian or otherwise, has more material in print than C. H. Spurgeon.

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Eternal Father, Strong to Save – Christian Navy Hymn with lyrics / Hymn to the Sea / Choir

Eternal Father, Strong to Save – Christian Navy Hymn with lyrics / Hymn to the Sea / Choir

Words: Will­iam Whit­ing, 1860. He wrote the lyr­ics as a po­em for a stu­dent about to sail for Amer­i­ca.

Music: Melita, John B. Dykes, in Hymns An­cient and Mo­dern, 1861. Dykes fit­ting­ly named the tune af­ter a lo­cale as­so­ci­at­ed with a Bib­li­cal ship­wreck. Mel­i­ta was the
isl­and the Apos­tle Paul reached af­ter his ship went down (Acts 28:1); to­day we know it as the isle of Mal­ta.

William Whiting (1825-1878)

In America, Eter­nal Fa­ther is oft­en called the Na­vy Hymn, be­cause it is sung at the Na­val Acad­e­my in An­na­po­lis, Ma­ry­land. It is al­so sung on ships of the Brit­ish Roy­al Na­vy and has been trans­lat­ed in­to French. It was the fa­vor­ite hymn of U.S. Pres­i­dent Frank­lin Roo­se­velt and was sung at his fun­er­al in Hyde Park, New York, Ap­ril 1945. The Na­vy Band played it in 1963 as U.S. Pre­si­dent John Ken­ne­dys bo­dy was car­ried up the steps of the U.S. Cap­i­tol to lie in state. Roo­se­velt served as Sec­re­ta­ry of the Na­vy, and Ken­ne­dy was a PT boat com­mand­er in World War II.

The original words were written as a hymn by a schoolmaster and clergyman of the Church of England, the Rev. William Whiting. Rev. Whiting (1825-1878) resided on the English coast near the sea and had once survived a furious storm in the Mediterranean. His experiences inspired him to pen the ode, “Eternal Father, Strong to Save.” In the following year, 1861, the words were adapted to music by another English clergyman, the Rev. John B. Dykes (1823-1876) , who had originally written the music as “Melita” (ancient name for the Mediterranean island of Malta). Rev. Dykes’ name may be recognized as that of the composer given credit for the music to many other well-known hymns, including “Holy, Holy, Holy,” “Lead, Kindly Light,” “Jesus, Lover of My Soul,” and “Nearer, My God to Thee.”
In the United States, in 1879 the late Rear Adm. Charles Jackson Train, an 1865 graduate of the United States Naval Academy at Annapolis was a lieutenant commander stationed at the Academy in charge of the Midshipman Choir. In that year, Lt. Comdr. Train inaugurated the present practice of concluding each Sunday’s Divine Services at the Academy with the singing of the first verse of this hymn.
The hymn, entitled “Eternal Father, Strong to Save,” is found in most Protestant Hymnals. It can be more easily located in these hymnals by consulting the “Index to First Lines” under “Eternal Father, Strong to Save.” The words have been changed several times since the original hymn by Rev. Whiting was first published in 1860-61. One will find that the verses as now published differ from the original primarily in the choice of one or two words in several lines of each verse.

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